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Mets announce changes to Citi Field dimensions

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Citi Field stands to become more hitter-friendly as fences are moved in once again.

Adam Hunger-USA TODAY Sports

A month after announcing its plan to alter Citi Field's dimensions for the second time in three years, the Mets have revealed more specific details of the changes. According to multiple sources, right center field fences have been brought in 10 feet closer to home plate, while the right field wall is now five feet closer.

After an abysmal offensive display last season in Citi Field in which the Mets hit .224/.296/.349 with 59 home runs—compared to a .252/.321/.379 line with 66 long balls on the road—Sandy Alderson felt changes were necessary to give the offense a spark. However, the Mets' visiting opponents didn't have much issue with the stadium, as they still managed 71 home runs in Flushing last year.

In addition, according to quick research by Amazin' Avenue commenter Curtis3331, moving the fences in ended up hurting the Mets more than helping them.

From 2009-2011 the Mets pitchers gave up 254 homers on the road and 186 at home (440 total); from 2012-2014 they gave up 205 on the road and 249 at home (454 total). Making the gross assumption that the road parks they played at had approximately the same weighted average homer factor in both eras, they were 19.3% less likely to give up a homer on the road in the more recent era, but 33.9% more likely to give up a homer in Citi.

From 2009-2011 the Mets hitters hit 169 homers on the road and 162 at home (331 total); from 2012-2014 they hit 209 on the road and 185 at home (394 total). Making the same gross assumption as above, they were 23.7% more likely to hit a homer on the road in the more recent era, but only 14.2% more likely to hit one at home.

So, by moving the fences in before the 2012 season we improved our opponents’ homer hitting by 33.9%, but only improved our own by 14.2%.