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Mets Morning News: Relievers on the radar

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Your Friday morning dose of New York Mets and MLB news, notes, and links.

MLB: Minnesota Twins at New York Mets Anthony Gruppuso-USA TODAY Sports

Meet the Mets

John Harper of the Daily News prefers Giants righty Sergio Romo over other bullpen options in free agency.

Over at the Post, Kevin Kernan churned out a short write-up of another reliever on the team’s radar, veteran lefty Craig Breslow, “the smartest man in baseball.”

MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo examined arguably the most important factor for Mets success in 2017: the health of their starting pitchers.

This FanGraphs deep dive on Jay Bruce will leave you oddly optimistic about the team holding on to him for Opening Day.

Speaking of optimism, SNY analyst Ron Darling has plenty of it heading into the 2017 season.

Around the NL East

The Record previewed the division, and which teams got better and which got worse over the offseason.

Talking Chop previewed the Braves’ High-A teams on their podcast, the Road to Atlanta.

Minor League Ball’s John Sickels ranked the Marlins’ top 20 prospects, and Fish Stripes reacted accordingly.

The Good Phight checked in on the Phillies’ upcoming spring training battle for the backup catcher role.

The Nationals held on to Stephen Drew for one year at $3.5 million.

Around the Majors

Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports predicts the trade deadline “is going to be insane.”

Grant Brisbee made an argument for an Angels run to the postseason.

Craig Edwards of FanGraphs looked at the worst hitters in the Hall of Fame to gauge the likelihood of former shortstop Omar Vizquel’s enshrinement.

Yesterday at AA

In addition to Romo and Breslow, the Mets’ hunt for bullpen help includes interest in Joe Smith and a reunion with Jerry Blevins.

This Date in Mets History

In 2007, former Mets general manager Bing Devine passed away. He was only GM for one season, 1967, after serving as an assistant for three years. Under Devine, the Mets added and developed several pitchers that became World Series champs in 1969: Tom Seaver, Jerry Koosman, Nolan Ryan, Gary Gentry, and Jim McAndrew.