clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Mets Morning News: Defeat in the desert

New, 420 comments

Your Friday morning dose of New York Mets and MLB news, notes, and links.

MLB: New York Mets at Arizona Diamondbacks Rick Scuteri-USA TODAY Sports

Meet the Mets

The Mets fell to the Diamondbacks on Thursday night, 6-3; they haven’t scored more than three runs in a game in their last 10 tries. Solo shots from Brandon Nimmo, Michael Conforto, and Amed Rosario accounted for the Mets’ offense. Jason Vargas surrendered three runs in a five-inning start, Paul Sewald walked a run in with the bases loaded, and Jacob Rhame coughed up a pair of bombs in the eighth.

Choose your recap: Amazin’ Avenue short and long, Daily News, Post, Newsday, Times, BP Mets, MLB.com.

Nimmo has the painful distinction of being one of the game’s best when it comes to getting hit by pitches.

Conforto made a tweak to his approach, waiting on pitches to get deeper into the hitting zone before attacking, and it immediately paid off.

Struggling infielder Jose Reyes expressed displeasure over his lack of playing time.

Around the National League East

Anibal Sanchez continued his hot stretch for the Braves, tossing seven shutout frames in a 4-2 win over the Padres.

The Marlins forced extras with a run in the bottom of the ninth, but fell to the Giants 6-3 in 16.

During a 9-3 win over the Rockies, the Phillies wore powder blue and Jim Thome launched hot dogs at fans.

Around Major League Baseball

In a strikeout-heavy area, these pitchers are still managing to be effective by pitching to contact.

The Pirates are expected to be aggressive sellers at the trade deadline, barring a dramatic turnaround.

Yesterday at Amazin’ Avenue

Vasilis Drimalitis previewed the Mets’ four-game set in Arizona.

Marshall Field covered the promotions of Peter Alonso and Jeff McNeil to Triple-A.

The Amazin’ Avenue Audio gang took on the seemingly impossible task of fixing the team.

This Date in Mets History

In the “Midnight Massacre” of 1977, the Mets traded Tom Seaver to the Reds for four players. But they at least partially redeemed themselves six years later by acquiring Keith Hernandez in exchange for a pair of pitchers.