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2018 Mets draft profile: Tylor Megill

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With their eighth selection in the 2018 draft, the Mets selected Tylor Megill, a right-handed pitcher from California.

Name: Tylor Megill

Born: Seal Beach, California

Age: 22 (7/28/1995)

Height/Weight: 6’6”/230 lbs.

Position: RHP

Bats/Throws: R/R

School: University of Arizona

A graduate of Los Alamitos High School, Tylor Megill went undrafted as a high school senior and attended Loyola Marymount University. Playing with his older brother, Trevor, he posted a 3.95 ERA in 57.0 innings split between the starting rotation and bullpen, allowing 53 hits, walking 23, and striking out 41. When his brother was drafted by the San Diego Padres and left to become a professional, Tylor left Loyola University as well, transferring to Cypress Junior College. As a member of the Chargers, he posted a 3.72 ERA in 101.2 innings, allowing 119 hits, walking 29, and striking out 87. Of his 17 appearances, 16 came as a starter. He left Cypress College in the summer of 2016 and transferred to the University of Arizona. He started three early season games for the Wildcats, surrendering 10 runs in 6 innings and didn’t make it out of the second in his first two outings. Megill finished the season in the bullpen and after posting a 5.55 ERA in 35.2 innings, dedicated his summer to improving himself. He reported to camp roughly 15-pounds lighter and while the results were not necessarily night-and-day, the improvements were tangible. In 32.2 innings this season, he posted a 4.68 ERA, allowing 38 hits, walking 14, and striking out 38.

The 6’6”, 230-pound Megill has an athletic pitcher’s build. He uses a high three-quarters arm slot, with medium arm action. His delivery is low effort, with a long, loose arm action. He throws with a crossfire delivery, which can create a difficult angle for opposing hitters, but it also affects his command, frequently missing to the arm-side part of the plate when he releases the ball too early and missing to the glove-side part of the plate when he releases the ball too late.

His fastball sits in the low-90s, peaking at 95 MPH. Thanks to his long stride, long arm extension, and crossfire delivery, the pitch features late life and heavy tailing action. He works better to the glove side but can throw strikes when necessary to the arm side, though his control there is not as precise. He complements his fastball with a power curveball. The pitch features hard 11-5 break and, while inconsistent, flashes average at times, getting plenty of swings-and-misses.