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2019 Mets draft profile: Jordan Martinson

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With their eleventh selection in the 2019 draft, the Mets selected Jordan Martinson, a left-hand pitcher from Texas.

Born: North Richland Hills, Texas

Age: 22 (3/07/97)

Height/Weight: 6’/210 lbs.

Position: LHP

Bats/Throws: L/L

School: Dallas Baptist (Dallas, Texas)

Jordan Martinson lettered three years while playing at Birdville High School in Richland Hills, Texas. He won various All-State and All-District honors, being recognized as the district’s Pitcher of the Year in 2014, and the district’s MVP as a senior. His domination while on the baseball diamond came as no surprise, as he comes from a family of athletes. His brother, Jason, played baseball at Texas State and was drafted by the Washington Nationals in the fifth round of the 2010 MLB Draft, and played in their minor league system for nine years before finally being tendered his release this season. Jordan initially had a commitment to Tusculum University, but ended up enrolling at Dallas Baptist.

In his first year with the Patriots, Martinson posted a 3.68 ERA in 71.0 innings, allowing 56 hits, walking 41, and striking out 59. In 2017, he led the Patriots in starts and wins, but had a down year overall, posting a 4.78 ERA in 81.0 innings, allowing 77 hits, walking 35, and striking out 75. He played in the Cape Cod League that summer, pitching for the Hyannis Harbor Hawks, but continued scuffling. In 21.0 innings on the Cape, he posted an even 6.00 ERA, allowing 25 hits, walking 3, and striking out 18. His 2018 junior season was abbreviated due to an injury, and when he returned to the mound in mid-April he posted a 4.85 ERA in 29.2 innings, allowing 32 hits, walking 10, and striking out 25. Having gone undrafted, he finished up his collegiate career at Dallas Baptist, posting a 2.71 ERA in 86.0 innings through NCAA Regionals.

Martinson throws from a low three-quarters arm slot, and because of some drop-and-drive in his delivery, his release point is low. There is some concern in his arm action, as he stabs behind his back a bit. His arm speed is below average, and he has a slingy delivery as a result.

The southpaw’s fastball sits in the high-80s-to-low-90s, topping out at 91 MPH. The pitch has a high spin rate and he generally throws the pitch upstairs to fool batters with it. In addition to his fastball, he throws a slider and a changeup. Martinson has an analytical mind, regularly using TrackMan and other radar and statistical data to adjust his approach from game to game, making the most of his underwhelming stuff.